New Texas

The Musicality of Olu Obafemi’s Illuminations

The Musicality of Olu Obafemi’s Illuminations

by Oluwatosin John Ibitoye Introduction Poetry, a form of literature and a medium of performance does not exist in a vacuum, especially in Africa where poets source from oral tradition. From the visual aesthetics and imageries depicted in reader’s mind, the performative tendencies are not far-fetched. Grabner asserts that “performance poems use elements that appealRead more about The Musicality of Olu Obafemi’s Illuminations[...]

Ekphrastic Poetry as Feminist Call-and-Response

Ekphrastic Poetry as Feminist Call-and-Response

by Suzette Bishop Nancy Miller in her essay, “Arachnologies: The Woman, the Text, and the Critic,” identifies a feminist way of reading and making meaning as a weaving like a spider’s web. An example of such a feminist weaving is Ntozake Shange’s collection of poetry and prose responses to visual art titled Ridin’ the MoonRead more about Ekphrastic Poetry as Feminist Call-and-Response[...]

Racial/Body Politics and Concessional Hegemony

Racial/Body Politics and Concessional Hegemony

by Okwudiri Anasiudu Introduction Racial politics as a concept is woven around the ideological state apparatus of any society in which it is practised. It shares similarity with systemic racism which finds its voice in the economy, judiciary, religion, and it is articulated through the resources of language and daily social relations (Racist America, xiv).Read more about Racial/Body Politics and Concessional Hegemony[...]

Trauma in Amma Darko’s Beyond the Horizon

Trauma in Amma Darko’s Beyond the Horizon

Margaret Fafa Nutsukpo Department of English Studies University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria. ABSTRACT This paper examines the concept of trauma as a significant theme in Amma Darko’s Beyond the Horizon. Using feminism and the contemporary literary trauma theory as a framework, the manifestations of trauma in the novel and their impact on the protagonist areRead more about Trauma in Amma Darko’s Beyond the Horizon[...]

Death Is Just the Limo Driver: Re-Envisioning “Because I could not stop for Death” after Gazing at Emily Dickinson and Kate Scott Turner Gazing at Us by Suzette Bishop

Death Is Just the Limo Driver: Re-Envisioning “Because I could not stop for Death” after Gazing at Emily Dickinson and Kate Scott Turner Gazing at Us by Suzette Bishop

They make brief eye contact as the speaker climbs into the carriage. Death, in Emily Dickinson’s poem, “Because I could not stop for Death,” drops by unexpectedly for a nineteenth-century style date. Immortality, possibly a spinster, possibly not, is also in the carriage, “The Carriage held but just Ourselves-- / And Immortality” (lines 3-4). Immortality’sRead more about Death Is Just the Limo Driver: Re-Envisioning “Because I could not stop for Death” after Gazing at Emily Dickinson and Kate Scott Turner Gazing at Us by Suzette Bishop[...]